Sentences and Sentence Patterns   
Verbs    Verbals    Verb Tense
Sentence Structure    Sentence Clarity and Combining   Sentence Patterns     Run on sentences

Identifying Sentences:  Nearly every complete sentence has at least a verb and subject.
A more complete analysis of the structure and makeup of sentences can be examined in:

Diagramming Sentences  Diagrams of moderately long and complex sentences are accompanied by explanations for both
beginners and experienced diagrammers.  
www.geocities.com/gene_moutoux/diagrams.htm

Subject

Verb

Object

The subject of the sentence:
who or what the sentence is about

 

What does the subject do?
The infinitive form of all verbs
begins with "to"
    to ______ (some action) 
     
(or a Verb Phrase)
If the root fits after "to"
and makes sense, it's a verb.
(to eat, to walk)

What or who is the action done to or for?

The object of the action of the verb can be either direct or indirect. Or it can be an objective (prepositional) phrase.
 
The object represents to whom or for whom the action takes place...

Noun or a Pronoun

Action or State of being  (to be)

Noun or Pronoun

Sentence Patterns:English word order is normally SUBJECT - VERB - OBJECT.
 Following are the commonly used sentence patterns:
1. SUBJECT - VERB:                                                                               Coyotes howl.
2. SUBJECT -VERB-OBJECT:                                                              Elephants frighten mice.
3. SUBJECT - VERB - INDIRECT OBJECT - DIRECT OBJECT:  Mary baked Fred a cake
4. There - VERB – SUBJECT: 1                                                             There have been objections.
5. AUXILIARY - SUBJECT - VERB?                                                    Do coyotes howl in the distance?
6. AUXILIARY - SUBJECT - VERB - OBJECT?                                Have mice ever frightened elephants?
7. AUXILIARY - SUBJECT - VERB - INDIRECT OBJECT - DIRECT OBJECT?   Will Mary bake Fred a cake?
8. OBJECT - AUXILIARY- SUBJECT - VERB?                                 What did the mice frighten?
9. VERB - there - SUBJECT? 1                                                              Were there any objections?
10. AUXILIARY - there - VERB - SUBJECT?                                Have there been any objections?
Common patterns of commands (imperative sentences) are derived from the first three statement patterns.
Many exclamatory sentences are also derived from patterns of statements.
            There have been a hundred objections!                                   Mary baked Fred a cake!
Such Sentences as the following, usually take an exclamation point:
            How many objections there were!                                            What a cake Mary baked Fred!
A sentence pattern such as the following may be a statement, a question or an exclamation:
            Mice Frighten elephants.       Mice frighten elephants?        Mice frighten elephants!
1There used as an introductory work or filler is an expletive, which is never
the subject.

   Adverb   Art of Argument   Conjugation   Dictionary   Grammar   Linguistics  Rhetoric   Run on sentences  
  
Sentences & Sentence Patterns   Syntax  Syntax2   Thesaurus   Verb Tenses   Writing with Purpose             

Return to Main Page                                 

Topics  www.WritingResource.org/ Adventures in Writing Links and references
Sentence Structure Sentence Patterns   172-200 Sentence Structure
Run-on Sentences Run-on/Comma Splice/Fused 188 Quiz: RUN-ON SENTENCES

View Larger Cover ImageThe books at the left are recommended resources for those who want to write effectively.  They can supplement any secondary, college, or graduate-level writing project.  If you would like to obtain either book, click at left.  The Writers Harbrace Handbook is a basic guide and rulebook for writers.  It has particularly useful resources on rhetoric.  Adventures in writing is designed as a practical guide for the writing process.  The book is designed for people who want to improve their writing, including students from  non-English based learning environments.  
                 For questions, contact
Tim@WritingResource.org/

Search the web with Google!

Google

Return to the Main Page and discover more resources and tips. 
 
mail: writingresource@writingresource.org  or contactus@writingresource.info

Sentence Construction

Sentence Parts, Patterns, and Variety

Sentence Errors

Sentence Punctuation

Clauses and Phrases

Dangling Modifiers

          Parallel Structure   Parallel Structure: web page or PDF

Cause & Effect, Comparison &  Contrast, Definition, Description, Narrative, Persuasion, Process Analysis, Essays